Noface- nameless

Justice through education and advocacy.: My Brother Could Not Wait 

ebclc:

By Michael Ng

Michael Ng wrote this piece in loving memory of his brother, Osvaldo, who died May 29th, 2013.

image

My brother committed suicide last week.

Osvaldo was a talented painter and a sharp wit. He was a brother, a son and a loving uncle to sixteen nieces and nephews.

"When political vagaries took away that right, he waited, because this country was his home, and we were his family.


He waited for change. He waited as he listened to the ugly words of our political leaders, telling him he had broken the rules and that the only life he knew was stolen from those fortunate enough to have been born here. He waited as long as he could, and then he could wait no longer.”

@1 year ago with 68 notes
#undocumented #immigration 

Freedom University Scholarship Fund  

In hopes of aiding the students in achieving higher education at a credited colleges and universities, and acknowledging that undocumented students pay out-of-state or international fees (3 to 4 times in-state-tuition), we started the Freedom University Scholarship Fund. The scholarship aims to help cover additional and necessary expenses for attending school such as administrative fees, transportation, clothing, personal care supplies, etc.

 

This fundraiser is about to reach it’s deadline!! Please please consider donating to the FU scholarship fund! The fund will help passionate undocumented young people go to college!!!

@1 year ago with 14 notes
#Education #donation #fundraiser #undocumented #immigration #higher education #college #university #Freedom University 
pag-asaharibon:

Why Immigration Is an Asian American Issue

Asian Americans* are the fastest-growing immigrant population in the United States today. According to 2011 Census data, almost half of all immigrants in the United States—18.2 million—came from Asia. This group overwhelmingly supported President Barack Obama for re-election—by 68 percent—and cares deeply about fixing the immigration system.
This support for immigration reform is critical as the Senate moves to take up an immigration reform bill, S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. Currently, family sponsorship is the most common way that Asian immigrants arrive in the United States, with 55 percent of Asian immigrants coming through the family-visa system in 2012. However, while S. 744 creates new legal pathways for immigrants to enter the country, it also threatens family reunification by removing entirely the allocation for siblings of U.S. citizens.
May marks Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. It is a celebration of the cultures of this diverse group, as well as an opportunity to educate the public on the past and present contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the social fabric of America. As the month-long celebration wraps up, here are the facts you need to know about Asian Americans and immigration. (read more)
Tram Kieu was an intern with the Immigration team at the Center for American Progress.
* The term Asian American includes any person from Asia living in the United States from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent/South/South Central Asia as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.

pag-asaharibon:

Why Immigration Is an Asian American Issue

Asian Americans* are the fastest-growing immigrant population in the United States today. According to 2011 Census data, almost half of all immigrants in the United States—18.2 million—came from Asia. This group overwhelmingly supported President Barack Obama for re-election—by 68 percent—and cares deeply about fixing the immigration system.

This support for immigration reform is critical as the Senate moves to take up an immigration reform bill, S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. Currently, family sponsorship is the most common way that Asian immigrants arrive in the United States, with 55 percent of Asian immigrants coming through the family-visa system in 2012. However, while S. 744 creates new legal pathways for immigrants to enter the country, it also threatens family reunification by removing entirely the allocation for siblings of U.S. citizens.

May marks Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. It is a celebration of the cultures of this diverse group, as well as an opportunity to educate the public on the past and present contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the social fabric of America. As the month-long celebration wraps up, here are the facts you need to know about Asian Americans and immigration. (read more)

Tram Kieu was an intern with the Immigration team at the Center for American Progress.

* The term Asian American includes any person from Asia living in the United States from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent/South/South Central Asia as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.

(via fascinasians)

@1 year ago with 81 notes
#APIA undocumented #immigration 
weareamericaishome:

“ I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.”
This was the only recordable family photo where all four of us are in one frame. Taken when my two cousins from South Korea visited us, and whom we haven’t seen in 11 years. [From left to right: my brother, my cousin, myself, my cousin; my mom and dad up front] Taken in 2009. 


This was my submission for a $1000 photo prize in advocating for “family first”discussion in the immigration reform 
——Finding our Family Photo  —-
It was not easy finding a photo of my family where my mom, dad, brother and I were all present in one setting, posing for the camera at the same time, with the oddly resembling smiles in one picture frame. Actually, I couldn’t find one of just us four.
Our pictures are in pieces:
The poorly focused photo of my brother in 6th grade band, where it takes a whole minute to find his saxophone blowing face out of numerous of other floating heads….
The work-in-action photo of my mom with the unnatural smile in front of a sewing machine that I took for a school project…
And the harder to find picture of my camera shy dad, who always repeats, “My aged self is not pretty to see in pictures.”
The awkwardly picture-less family album, and the oddly fitting reality, the invisible family pictures tells the story of my family’s immigration experience.
The four of us is all we have. And though no luxury granted family photo ops for us to prove that we are one, every day we wake up fighting for each other.

Fighting to survive together.

Often in the pro-immigrant political rhetoric, people point fingers at my parents for their decision to move to the US, in order to legitimate my [undocumented] existence in this country.
While pointing at me, they say, “This innocent child had no choice but to follow her parents”, shaming my mom and dad for the years I lived in this country, “illegally.”
To win votes, to “protect” my filtered-prized goals and dreams, they shove my parents behind doors, shaming their struggles, silencing their existence.

But they are wrong.

My family moved here as one.
I am here with my dreams and goals because of my parents.
I am breathing here today, right this moment, because of my family.

We support each other, we move together, we dream together, and we fight for each other every-single-day.

My family’s experience, my immigrant story is of one collective struggle; filled with love, tears, cries and laughters that belong to my mom, my dad, and my brother.
If you want to talk about my DREAMS, you cannot isolate my family.
Though our pictures are scattered, we move as one.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.

weareamericaishome:

 I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.

I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.

I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.”

This was the only recordable family photo where all four of us are in one frame. Taken when my two cousins from South Korea visited us, and whom we haven’t seen in 11 years. [From left to right: my brother, my cousin, myself, my cousin; my mom and dad up front] Taken in 2009. 

This was my submission for a $1000 photo prize in advocating for “family first”discussion in the immigration reform 

——Finding our Family Photo  —-

It was not easy finding a photo of my family where my mom, dad, brother and I were all present in one setting, posing for the camera at the same time, with the oddly resembling smiles in one picture frame. Actually, I couldn’t find one of just us four.

Our pictures are in pieces:

The poorly focused photo of my brother in 6th grade band, where it takes a whole minute to find his saxophone blowing face out of numerous of other floating heads….

The work-in-action photo of my mom with the unnatural smile in front of a sewing machine that I took for a school project…

And the harder to find picture of my camera shy dad, who always repeats, “My aged self is not pretty to see in pictures.”

The awkwardly picture-less family album, and the oddly fitting reality, the invisible family pictures tells the story of my family’s immigration experience.

The four of us is all we have. And though no luxury granted family photo ops for us to prove that we are one, every day we wake up fighting for each other.

Fighting to survive together.

Often in the pro-immigrant political rhetoric, people point fingers at my parents for their decision to move to the US, in order to legitimate my [undocumented] existence in this country.

While pointing at me, they say, “This innocent child had no choice but to follow her parents”, shaming my mom and dad for the years I lived in this country, “illegally.”

To win votes, to “protect” my filtered-prized goals and dreams, they shove my parents behind doors, shaming their struggles, silencing their existence.

But they are wrong.

My family moved here as one.

I am here with my dreams and goals because of my parents.

I am breathing here today, right this moment, because of my family.

We support each other, we move together, we dream together, and we fight for each other every-single-day.

My family’s experience, my immigrant story is of one collective struggle; filled with love, tears, cries and laughters that belong to my mom, my dad, and my brother.

If you want to talk about my DREAMS, you cannot isolate my family.

Though our pictures are scattered, we move as one.

I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.

I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.

I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.

@1 year ago with 74 notes
#thisismyfamily #nakasec #APIA #APIA undocumented #undocumented #korean undocumented #family #immigration #creative writing #API 
messylittleposts:

How I feel about the 844 page CIR bill

No need to reinvent the wheel 
I trust Prerna 

messylittleposts:

How I feel about the 844 page CIR bill

No need to reinvent the wheel 

I trust Prerna 

(via unapologeticmuslim)

@1 year ago with 8 notes
#CIR 2013 #Immigration 
meetmyimmigrantmom:

My Immigrant Mom, Ki Jung, came to the United States in January 1998.  She has never stopped sacrificing for my sister and me ever since.  As a single mother, she worked 70 hour weeks as a waitress to support my sister and me.  Never once having basic workers’ protections and rights that Americans are typically given, she worked as a waitress until 2005.  When her legs gave out, in order to continue supporting our family, she carried on as a nail salon worker, breathing toxic fumes.
In 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer, requiring her to have a mastectomy and radiation/chemotherapy afterwards.  When she decided to go through with her surgery, that gave me the courage to come out as undocumented and speak out to protect my community.  Two years after her surgery, she was also diagnosed with pituitary adenoma, a benign tumor in her pituitary gland that was slowly making her blind.  Only at the urging of her children, she stopped working and sought medical care.
Even now, she still doesn’t give up.  Against her doctor’s wishes, she continues to work so that our family lives a comfortable life.
I will hopefully never know what it means to leave my entire family behind to start a life in a new country.  I will never know what it means to raise two children as a single mother.
Saranghae, umma!

<3 

meetmyimmigrantmom:

My Immigrant Mom, Ki Jung, came to the United States in January 1998.  She has never stopped sacrificing for my sister and me ever since.  As a single mother, she worked 70 hour weeks as a waitress to support my sister and me.  Never once having basic workers’ protections and rights that Americans are typically given, she worked as a waitress until 2005.  When her legs gave out, in order to continue supporting our family, she carried on as a nail salon worker, breathing toxic fumes.

In 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer, requiring her to have a mastectomy and radiation/chemotherapy afterwards.  When she decided to go through with her surgery, that gave me the courage to come out as undocumented and speak out to protect my community.  Two years after her surgery, she was also diagnosed with pituitary adenoma, a benign tumor in her pituitary gland that was slowly making her blind.  Only at the urging of her children, she stopped working and sought medical care.

Even now, she still doesn’t give up.  Against her doctor’s wishes, she continues to work so that our family lives a comfortable life.

I will hopefully never know what it means to leave my entire family behind to start a life in a new country.  I will never know what it means to raise two children as a single mother.

Saranghae, umma!

<3 

@1 year ago with 411 notes
#korean #Korean American #korean undocumented #immigration #family #undocumted 

With the recent appearance of Junot Diaz on The Colbert Report, many immigration rights activists and organizers have been borrowing his quotes and comments on immigration and Freedom University with photos to go along with it.

It’s great.. really.. great. But when people do not RECOGNIZE Freedom University, when Junot’s agreement to be on the show was on the bases of talking about FU in order to raise awareness about such amazing organization  it pisses me off that no one is sharing the FU website or the donation page. 

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html 

Guys. please share the link. 

We get so much public recognition, but we get like next to nothing when it comes to tangible support. we are always scraping by to buy books for students to use. 

and to all the shit talking about FU. 

Freedom U. and folks involved in the project are one of the most sincere and dedicated educators and immigrant rights supporters I have EVER met. We have never turned any individual down for ANY reason WHAT SO EVER except in the case when they live in locations where transportation is impossible. 

People need to stop talking shit and assuming things about Freedom U when they know nothing about it or the people involved. It’s really heartbreaking to see “allies” and groups who claim to be in “solidarity” making false assumptions about FU.

 

 

 

@1 year ago with 39 notes
#Freedom University #georgia #immigration #undocumented #Undocumented Youth #undocumented immigrant #education #Junot Díaz #junot diaz #higher education #the colbert report 

it’s not their fault

I don’t know why we are still blaming our parents for our undocumented statuses. 

I really dont like the line that goes “they never had a say in immigrating” “they had no control “ 

as if my parents did.

as if our parents did. 

it’s the broken system. it’s the global economy

no one just wakes up one day, no parent just decide over-night to start a new life, away from family friends culture, to be treated like dregs of society  NO ONE. 

stop saying we had no say  it in.. as if that is to make us seem more vulnerable. i dont want to buy pity from anyone. 

damn. 

@1 year ago with 13 notes
#undocumented immigrant #immigration #undocumented #APIA undocumented #Korean undocumented 

Freedom University Scholarship Fund  

guyaconnect:

noface-nameless:

In hopes of aiding the students in achieving higher education at a credited colleges and universities, and acknowledging that undocumented students pay out-of-state or international fees (3 to 4 times in-state-tuition), we started the Freedom University Scholarship Fund. The scholarship aims to help cover additional and necessary expenses for attending school such as administrative fees, transportation, clothing, personal care supplies, etc.

 

This fundraiser is about to reach it’s deadline!! Please please consider donating to the FU scholarship fund! The fund will help passionate undocumented young people go to college!!!

ONE DAY LEFT! PLEASE DONATE WHAT YOU CAN!! 

It’s CRUNCH time for Freedom University scholarship fund fundraiser!! 

Please help reach our goal! We know how scarce scholarship opportunities are for undocumented students. help us create another life changing opportunity for some of these students! 


http://www.youcaring.com/tuition-fundraiser/freedom-university-scholarship-fund-/74535

21 hours remaining!! 

Thank you everyone who have donated so far!! 

Freedom University is also gearing up for it’s 3 session of classes! Please support FU for their amazing work nurturing young undocumented immigrants, encouraging them to not to give up on their dreams of obtaining higher education!

@1 year ago with 14 notes
#undocumented #immigration #education #higher education #fundraiser #college #freedom university #georgia 

Help Freedom University reach their fundraising goal!! Share the link and Donate!! 

The Freedom University Scholarship fund hopes raise enough money to award six $2,500 scholarships to undocumented young people attending universities in the upcoming school year! 

http://www.youcaring.com/tuition-fundraiser/freedom-university-scholarship-fund-/74535

@1 year ago with 13 notes
#Undocumented Youth #education #higher education #Freedom University #undocumented #immigration #fundraiser 

queerdesi:

flavia-isabel:

For the peanut gallery.

LOL.

<3

hahahahahhaha

this is so funnyy 

@1 year ago with 13 notes
#CIR #immigration 

right after discussing about affirmative action and how problematic the rhetoric of “PoC are taking seats away from our children” is, the same group of students including other PoC strongly opposed the NY Dream Act because “well they these undocumented kids are taking our spots and that’s not fair” 

I was appalled…. I mean how do you work with that??

@1 year ago with 1 note
#immigration #NY Dream Act #Affirmative Action #Poc #Solidarity ? 

La Kemster: Battling Silence 

kemee:

First, I was illegal

An identity given to me

By a socio-political complex

Hell-bent on forcing me to

Reject my notion of self.

 

Illegal is illegal, they said –

More than my age

More than my gender/sexuality

More than my humanity –

I was now this thing, an ‘it’

No longer a human being.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then, I was a dreamer

An identity that built

A collective consciousness

And finally made me

Part of an ‘us.’

 

I was put on a giddy high

Of dreams deferred

Of “I have a dream”

Of a rainbow of caps & gowns.

For we are the dreamers,

The mighty, mighty dreamers.

 

Never mind those whose dreams

We are not acknowledging because

They do not match our own.

Never mind those who will not make it

Far enough to don a cap and gown.

 

Suddenly, a proclamation:

“But we are all dreamers,”

documented or undocumented.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then I was undocumented

An identity borne of the realization

That I am more than just legislation,

That this new piece of paper

Would not magically heal the wounds of the struggle

Wrought by lack of papers to begin with,

That to drive home the assertion that

No human being is illegal,

We must first stop referring to ourselves as such,

That dreams without concrete, effective action and empowerment

Would not serve my growth.

 

Again, it was said:

“But we are all undocumented,”

united in this struggle.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then I became unafraid,

Unashamed,

Unapologetic –

About my immigration status,

About refusing to bow down

to rhetoric & political punting,

about choosing a movement over a campaign,

about acknowledging the full, wide, deep and beautiful

spectrum of the undocumented experience,

and about reclaiming my voice and

demanding that it be the only vehicle

through which my story is told.

 

This time though,

We were not “all unafraid.”

Instead, I was being divisive,

I was being stubborn,

I was selfish, petulant,

I was Radical.

 

Once again labeled an “other”

In the delicate world of “Us”

I called home.

 

I stay silent.

 

At the end of the day,

Though our many struggles and experiences intersect,

And you say we are all dreamers,

My dream of existence in a society

That still views me as illegal, as an it,

Has yet to come true.

 

You say we are all undocumented,

Yet I am the one who has to justify,

In a court of law,

The right to call the dirt I walk on

And the air I breathe

My Home.

 

Can I not claim an identity of my own,

Without it being co-opted, rebranded,

Misinterpreted and censored

by those who are not affected?

Those who support, understand,

Sympathize, fight alongside,

But who are not undocumented?

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand

the importance of my words,

for they are one of the few weapons I own.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand,

The necessity,

In a world in which

I am constantly told I have no rights,

To have an identity to call my own.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand that

My struggle is not about you.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand that

We both lose

When I remain silent.

 

forever reblog 

(Source: marginsintersections)

@1 year ago with 68 notes
#La Kemster #poem #creative writing #undocumented #immigration #battling silence 

In case you missed it,

Junot Diaz on The Colbert Report talking about Freedom University 

Please SHARE THE DONATION PAGE FOR FU 

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

And please take a step further in donating to the organization. Despite the large public coverage on FU, we never get donations and we have to constantly struggle not to stop classes. 

Share the love, not just words

@1 year ago with 22 notes
#Freedom University #Junot Díaz #junot diaz #the colbert report #education #higher education #georgia #undocumented #immigration #undocumented immigration 
everyone is pushing for immigration these days.. but it seems like they are “pushing” some imaginary or intangible object because I dont see anything.
 
@1 year ago with 2 notes
#immigration 
Justice through education and advocacy.: My Brother Could Not Wait→

ebclc:

By Michael Ng

Michael Ng wrote this piece in loving memory of his brother, Osvaldo, who died May 29th, 2013.

image

My brother committed suicide last week.

Osvaldo was a talented painter and a sharp wit. He was a brother, a son and a loving uncle to sixteen nieces and nephews.

"When political vagaries took away that right, he waited, because this country was his home, and we were his family.


He waited for change. He waited as he listened to the ugly words of our political leaders, telling him he had broken the rules and that the only life he knew was stolen from those fortunate enough to have been born here. He waited as long as he could, and then he could wait no longer.”

1 year ago
#undocumented #immigration 
Freedom University Scholarship Fund →

guyaconnect:

noface-nameless:

In hopes of aiding the students in achieving higher education at a credited colleges and universities, and acknowledging that undocumented students pay out-of-state or international fees (3 to 4 times in-state-tuition), we started the Freedom University Scholarship Fund. The scholarship aims to help cover additional and necessary expenses for attending school such as administrative fees, transportation, clothing, personal care supplies, etc.

 

This fundraiser is about to reach it’s deadline!! Please please consider donating to the FU scholarship fund! The fund will help passionate undocumented young people go to college!!!

ONE DAY LEFT! PLEASE DONATE WHAT YOU CAN!! 

It’s CRUNCH time for Freedom University scholarship fund fundraiser!! 

Please help reach our goal! We know how scarce scholarship opportunities are for undocumented students. help us create another life changing opportunity for some of these students! 


http://www.youcaring.com/tuition-fundraiser/freedom-university-scholarship-fund-/74535

21 hours remaining!! 

Thank you everyone who have donated so far!! 

Freedom University is also gearing up for it’s 3 session of classes! Please support FU for their amazing work nurturing young undocumented immigrants, encouraging them to not to give up on their dreams of obtaining higher education!

1 year ago
#undocumented #immigration #education #higher education #fundraiser #college #freedom university #georgia 
Freedom University Scholarship Fund →

In hopes of aiding the students in achieving higher education at a credited colleges and universities, and acknowledging that undocumented students pay out-of-state or international fees (3 to 4 times in-state-tuition), we started the Freedom University Scholarship Fund. The scholarship aims to help cover additional and necessary expenses for attending school such as administrative fees, transportation, clothing, personal care supplies, etc.

 

This fundraiser is about to reach it’s deadline!! Please please consider donating to the FU scholarship fund! The fund will help passionate undocumented young people go to college!!!

1 year ago
#Education #donation #fundraiser #undocumented #immigration #higher education #college #university #Freedom University 
1 year ago
#Undocumented Youth #education #higher education #Freedom University #undocumented #immigration #fundraiser 
pag-asaharibon:

Why Immigration Is an Asian American Issue

Asian Americans* are the fastest-growing immigrant population in the United States today. According to 2011 Census data, almost half of all immigrants in the United States—18.2 million—came from Asia. This group overwhelmingly supported President Barack Obama for re-election—by 68 percent—and cares deeply about fixing the immigration system.
This support for immigration reform is critical as the Senate moves to take up an immigration reform bill, S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. Currently, family sponsorship is the most common way that Asian immigrants arrive in the United States, with 55 percent of Asian immigrants coming through the family-visa system in 2012. However, while S. 744 creates new legal pathways for immigrants to enter the country, it also threatens family reunification by removing entirely the allocation for siblings of U.S. citizens.
May marks Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. It is a celebration of the cultures of this diverse group, as well as an opportunity to educate the public on the past and present contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the social fabric of America. As the month-long celebration wraps up, here are the facts you need to know about Asian Americans and immigration. (read more)
Tram Kieu was an intern with the Immigration team at the Center for American Progress.
* The term Asian American includes any person from Asia living in the United States from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent/South/South Central Asia as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau.
1 year ago
#APIA undocumented #immigration 
1 year ago
#CIR #immigration 
weareamericaishome:

“ I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.”
This was the only recordable family photo where all four of us are in one frame. Taken when my two cousins from South Korea visited us, and whom we haven’t seen in 11 years. [From left to right: my brother, my cousin, myself, my cousin; my mom and dad up front] Taken in 2009. 


This was my submission for a $1000 photo prize in advocating for &#8220;family first&#8221;discussion in the immigration reform 
&#8212;&#8212;Finding our Family Photo  &#8212;-
It was not easy finding a photo of my family where my mom, dad, brother and I were all present in one setting, posing for the camera at the same time, with the oddly resembling smiles in one picture frame. Actually, I couldn’t find one of just us four.
Our pictures are in pieces:
The poorly focused photo of my brother in 6th grade band, where it takes a whole minute to find his saxophone blowing face out of numerous of other floating heads….
The work-in-action photo of my mom with the unnatural smile in front of a sewing machine that I took for a school project…
And the harder to find picture of my camera shy dad, who always repeats, “My aged self is not pretty to see in pictures.”
The awkwardly picture-less family album, and the oddly fitting reality, the invisible family pictures tells the story of my family’s immigration experience.
The four of us is all we have. And though no luxury granted family photo ops for us to prove that we are one, every day we wake up fighting for each other.

Fighting to survive together.

Often in the pro-immigrant political rhetoric, people point fingers at my parents for their decision to move to the US, in order to legitimate my [undocumented] existence in this country.
While pointing at me, they say, “This innocent child had no choice but to follow her parents”, shaming my mom and dad for the years I lived in this country, “illegally.”
To win votes, to “protect” my filtered-prized goals and dreams, they shove my parents behind doors, shaming their struggles, silencing their existence.

But they are wrong.

My family moved here as one.
I am here with my dreams and goals because of my parents.
I am breathing here today, right this moment, because of my family.

We support each other, we move together, we dream together, and we fight for each other every-single-day.

My family’s experience, my immigrant story is of one collective struggle; filled with love, tears, cries and laughters that belong to my mom, my dad, and my brother.
If you want to talk about my DREAMS, you cannot isolate my family.
Though our pictures are scattered, we move as one.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future, because of my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am dreaming, hoping, and fighting for a better future with my mom, my dad, and my brother.
I am nothing without my family and they are my everything.
1 year ago
#thisismyfamily #nakasec #APIA #APIA undocumented #undocumented #korean undocumented #family #immigration #creative writing #API 

right after discussing about affirmative action and how problematic the rhetoric of “PoC are taking seats away from our children” is, the same group of students including other PoC strongly opposed the NY Dream Act because “well they these undocumented kids are taking our spots and that’s not fair” 

I was appalled…. I mean how do you work with that??

1 year ago
#immigration #NY Dream Act #Affirmative Action #Poc #Solidarity ? 
messylittleposts:

How I feel about the 844 page CIR bill

No need to reinvent the wheel 
I trust Prerna 
1 year ago
#CIR 2013 #Immigration 
La Kemster: Battling Silence→

kemee:

First, I was illegal

An identity given to me

By a socio-political complex

Hell-bent on forcing me to

Reject my notion of self.

 

Illegal is illegal, they said –

More than my age

More than my gender/sexuality

More than my humanity –

I was now this thing, an ‘it’

No longer a human being.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then, I was a dreamer

An identity that built

A collective consciousness

And finally made me

Part of an ‘us.’

 

I was put on a giddy high

Of dreams deferred

Of “I have a dream”

Of a rainbow of caps & gowns.

For we are the dreamers,

The mighty, mighty dreamers.

 

Never mind those whose dreams

We are not acknowledging because

They do not match our own.

Never mind those who will not make it

Far enough to don a cap and gown.

 

Suddenly, a proclamation:

“But we are all dreamers,”

documented or undocumented.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then I was undocumented

An identity borne of the realization

That I am more than just legislation,

That this new piece of paper

Would not magically heal the wounds of the struggle

Wrought by lack of papers to begin with,

That to drive home the assertion that

No human being is illegal,

We must first stop referring to ourselves as such,

That dreams without concrete, effective action and empowerment

Would not serve my growth.

 

Again, it was said:

“But we are all undocumented,”

united in this struggle.

 

I stay silent.

 

Then I became unafraid,

Unashamed,

Unapologetic –

About my immigration status,

About refusing to bow down

to rhetoric & political punting,

about choosing a movement over a campaign,

about acknowledging the full, wide, deep and beautiful

spectrum of the undocumented experience,

and about reclaiming my voice and

demanding that it be the only vehicle

through which my story is told.

 

This time though,

We were not “all unafraid.”

Instead, I was being divisive,

I was being stubborn,

I was selfish, petulant,

I was Radical.

 

Once again labeled an “other”

In the delicate world of “Us”

I called home.

 

I stay silent.

 

At the end of the day,

Though our many struggles and experiences intersect,

And you say we are all dreamers,

My dream of existence in a society

That still views me as illegal, as an it,

Has yet to come true.

 

You say we are all undocumented,

Yet I am the one who has to justify,

In a court of law,

The right to call the dirt I walk on

And the air I breathe

My Home.

 

Can I not claim an identity of my own,

Without it being co-opted, rebranded,

Misinterpreted and censored

by those who are not affected?

Those who support, understand,

Sympathize, fight alongside,

But who are not undocumented?

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand

the importance of my words,

for they are one of the few weapons I own.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand,

The necessity,

In a world in which

I am constantly told I have no rights,

To have an identity to call my own.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand that

My struggle is not about you.

 

If you truly support me,

You would understand that

We both lose

When I remain silent.

 

forever reblog 

(Source: marginsintersections)

1 year ago
#La Kemster #poem #creative writing #undocumented #immigration #battling silence 
meetmyimmigrantmom:

My Immigrant Mom, Ki Jung, came to the United States in January 1998.  She has never stopped sacrificing for my sister and me ever since.  As a single mother, she worked 70 hour weeks as a waitress to support my sister and me.  Never once having basic workers’ protections and rights that Americans are typically given, she worked as a waitress until 2005.  When her legs gave out, in order to continue supporting our family, she carried on as a nail salon worker, breathing toxic fumes.
In 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer, requiring her to have a mastectomy and radiation/chemotherapy afterwards.  When she decided to go through with her surgery, that gave me the courage to come out as undocumented and speak out to protect my community.  Two years after her surgery, she was also diagnosed with pituitary adenoma, a benign tumor in her pituitary gland that was slowly making her blind.  Only at the urging of her children, she stopped working and sought medical care.
Even now, she still doesn’t give up.  Against her doctor’s wishes, she continues to work so that our family lives a comfortable life.
I will hopefully never know what it means to leave my entire family behind to start a life in a new country.  I will never know what it means to raise two children as a single mother.
Saranghae, umma!

&lt;3 
1 year ago
#korean #Korean American #korean undocumented #immigration #family #undocumted 
1 year ago
#Freedom University #Junot Díaz #junot diaz #the colbert report #education #higher education #georgia #undocumented #immigration #undocumented immigration 

With the recent appearance of Junot Diaz on The Colbert Report, many immigration rights activists and organizers have been borrowing his quotes and comments on immigration and Freedom University with photos to go along with it.

It’s great.. really.. great. But when people do not RECOGNIZE Freedom University, when Junot’s agreement to be on the show was on the bases of talking about FU in order to raise awareness about such amazing organization  it pisses me off that no one is sharing the FU website or the donation page. 

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html

http://www.freedomuniversitygeorgia.com/donate—done.html 

Guys. please share the link. 

We get so much public recognition, but we get like next to nothing when it comes to tangible support. we are always scraping by to buy books for students to use. 

and to all the shit talking about FU. 

Freedom U. and folks involved in the project are one of the most sincere and dedicated educators and immigrant rights supporters I have EVER met. We have never turned any individual down for ANY reason WHAT SO EVER except in the case when they live in locations where transportation is impossible. 

People need to stop talking shit and assuming things about Freedom U when they know nothing about it or the people involved. It’s really heartbreaking to see “allies” and groups who claim to be in “solidarity” making false assumptions about FU.

 

 

 

1 year ago
#Freedom University #georgia #immigration #undocumented #Undocumented Youth #undocumented immigrant #education #Junot Díaz #junot diaz #higher education #the colbert report 
everyone is pushing for immigration these days.. but it seems like they are “pushing” some imaginary or intangible object because I dont see anything.
 
1 year ago
#immigration 
it’s not their fault

I don’t know why we are still blaming our parents for our undocumented statuses. 

I really dont like the line that goes “they never had a say in immigrating” “they had no control “ 

as if my parents did.

as if our parents did. 

it’s the broken system. it’s the global economy

no one just wakes up one day, no parent just decide over-night to start a new life, away from family friends culture, to be treated like dregs of society  NO ONE. 

stop saying we had no say  it in.. as if that is to make us seem more vulnerable. i dont want to buy pity from anyone. 

damn. 

1 year ago
#undocumented immigrant #immigration #undocumented #APIA undocumented #Korean undocumented